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19 April 2012 @ 12:58 am
Meme (Twice In One Night? What?)  
Just from my brain:

Name 5 of your favorite endings in any of your fandoms

So for this one I attempted to at least try and mix in some of my not usual fandoms. But a few slipped in anyway.

Spoilers under the cut for all aired seasons of Being Human (UK), White Collar, Brother Cadfael and conclusion for Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011).



1. Being Human - The end of Annie's story
We'd seen a lot of endings of late on this show. Mitchell's was heartbreaking in that he was the first in the trio to leave. George's was shocking and gut-wrenching. And then there was Annie's. Annie who got the sort of sweet, heartwarming conclusion she richly deserved for having endured so much. Lenora Crichlow's expression when Annie's door finally opened for her was an amazing bit of acting. All the joy and relief in her eyes was just wonderful. I sobbed a lot when Mitchell and George died but with Annie I just found myself tearing up in happiness for her and sadness for us the viewing audience that this would be our last scene with her.

2. White Collar - The end of "Judgement Day"
Neal had been articulating a lot about what he'd be leaving behind should he ever run at this point. He finally opened up to Peter in that he was honest about how he'd finally settled some roots in New York and had established relationships with people he didn't want to lose. Those people were Peter, Elizabeth, Sarah, the team at the Bureau. They were all now a part of Neal's life. A life that was no longer about fabrication and lying. And you could see all of that on Neal's face as he sat in the plane that was taking him away from all of that, seemingly forever. The long shot of Neal staring out the window as he processed what he'd just done in running away was excellent in that you got the feeling this was the first time Neal ever so deeply loathed the act of running away which was the go to tactic of old!Neal.

3. Brother Cadfael - The end of "The Pilgrim of Hate"
Before I obsessed over shows like Sherlock, I was in love with Derek Jacobi's excellent portrayal of Brother Cadfael, the 12th century Benedictine monk who was also an amateur sleuth. This particular episode featured two brothers. One brother was the formerly temperamental one who was on a pilgrimage of taking their father's body to all the holy relics sites as penance for having accidentally killed him in a fight. The other was the piously sadistic one who was tagging along to offer moral guidance to his wayward brother. The story ends with the reveal that it was the pious brother who willingly murdered their father. But despite this, the other brother insists on finishing his pilgrimage because, as he explains to Cadfael, it was still his fault that his past sins led his family to the moment his brother killed their father. This is a bit of a cheat for me because this isn't the final shot of the episode. But the 2nd to last shot is of him picking up the wagon bearing his father's body to continue on his path, barefoot and now alone. This show featured a lot of wonderful endings to their episodes (so much so that I picked two for this meme!) but this one with the music and cinematography ranks as one of the best.

4. Brother Cadfael - The end of "The Raven in the Foregate"
The big question in this episode was whether or not a young woman had committed suicide or was murdered. If she had committed suicide, she would be denied a burial on hallowed ground. Cadfael investigates out of personal distress as he feels he made an error in his judgment which may have led to the woman's demise. The episode concludes with the girl being buried just outside the gates of the abbey on secular ground due to the reveal that she did indeed kill herself. The final shot is of Cadfael bringing the deceased girl's small wooden crucifix necklace and pushing it into the freshly dug grave for her to have. What got me about this ending was how it perfectly captured Cadfael's character as a man of faith who so richly understood the fragility of the human heart and who never turned his back on anyone who had a good heart, despite their inability to follow the rules set to them by God.

5. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy - The end of the Old Circus
Nothing is quite as satisfying as seeing Gary Oldman's George Smiley take his position as Control at the end of this film. After all the work he put in and the layers of puzzles he had to solve and the moles to smoke out with nary a crack to his stony facade, it was well worth seeing the barest hint of a satisfied grin on Smiley's face as he sat at the head of the very room from which he was initially fired at the start of the movie.


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Astoundingly fond of avocados and rainy weather.: SPN_Rainguardian_chaos on April 19th, 2012 05:15 am (UTC)
I don't like to think about endings too much, so I think I'd have trouble thinking up enough of them to do this meme myself. I'd end up filling it up with things like, "That moment when Harry Dresden burnt his garlic bread beyond still being edible, and then Bob made fun of him for it." Or maybe the terrifying drumbeating at the end of Jumanji. Yes. I am full of serious thoughts.

Lenora Crichlow's expression when Annie's door finally opened for her was an amazing bit of acting.

Lenora in general is an amazing actress. I just had a thought--what do you think she'd be like as a companion for the next Doctor in Doctor Who? That could be interesting. She'd probably dominate the show, though. :)

I just found myself tearing up in happiness for her and sadness for us the viewing audience that this would be our last scene with her.

This was pretty much my exact reaction. Such a lovely scene. *sighs*

4. Brother Cadfael - The end of "The Raven in the Foregate"

I have never even seen that show, yet this entire description really moved me. That really does sound like an amazing ending.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on April 19th, 2012 05:20 am (UTC)
I just had a thought--what do you think she'd be like as a companion for the next Doctor in Doctor Who? That could be interesting. She'd probably dominate the show, though. :)

That would be interesting! It would depend a bit on who would be cast as the 12th Doctor. Hmmm...I wonder who might be a good fit. They might go with another relative unknown as they did with Matt Smith.

I have never even seen that show, yet this entire description really moved me. That really does sound like an amazing ending.

It's a pretty fantastic series. Derek Jacobi's acting was phenomenal from the start to finish for this series. They're all up on youTube if you're ever curious.
Astoundingly fond of avocados and rainy weather.: SPN_Rainguardian_chaos on April 19th, 2012 05:36 am (UTC)
I didn't ever really adapt to Matt Smith as the Doctor, or any of his companions. I'm hoping the next Doctor has more substance to him, whether he's known or unknown. I want more darkness in his character. Hey! Maybe Lenora should be the next Doctor! ...I...I'm verging on crack!fic with this train of thought, perhaps. *coughs*

And Derek Jacobi...why does that name sound so familiar?
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on April 19th, 2012 05:41 am (UTC)
And Derek Jacobi...why does that name sound so familiar?

BECAUSE HE'S THE GREATEST LIVING ACTOR ON EARTH.

Err...yeah. But you probably remember him as Professor Yana from Doctor Who.

He's done tons of amazing work and is a contemporary of actors such as Ian McKellan. They actually went to Cambridge together and McKellan has since spoken about his unrequited crush on Jacobi during their university days.
Astoundingly fond of avocados and rainy weather.: DW_Cheersguardian_chaos on April 19th, 2012 05:51 am (UTC)
*splutters and recoils* WELL, OKAY THEN!

And oohhhhh!! That's who he is! The fact that he was a side character (eh...kind of?), and yet I remember that name is already telling of the fact that I liked his acting in Doctor Who.

and McKellan has since spoken about his unrequited crush on Jacobi during their university days.

Hee! Aw, that's actually rather endearing. ^_^
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on April 19th, 2012 05:56 am (UTC)
The fact that he was a side character (eh...kind of?)

He seemingly was until it turned out he was the Master.

I'm watching clips from that episode now. God, I miss the days when Doctor Who still had heart.
Astoundingly fond of avocados and rainy weather.: DW_Cheersguardian_chaos on April 19th, 2012 06:05 am (UTC)
Yes, that was what my "kind of" referred to. XD

I'm watching clips from that episode now. God, I miss the days when Doctor Who still had heart.

Ah! Me too. I was watching "The Lazarus Experiment" a couple days ago, and it depressed me because the show's just not written the same anymore. Also: surprise Mark Gatiss as Lazarus! I had completely not noticed the first time around.

Perhaps I'm mistaken (since I'm viewing this from an outsider's perspective somewhat), but I feel like the Doctor Who fandom is also different now? They seem...lighter? As in, "obsessed with Karen's face" sort of lighter. I remember the Doctor Who fandom used to seem a lot more like it had a good grasp on concepts like time, and mortality, and the perils of immortality, and all sorts of neat themes before. And it seems so lessened now. :( But man, when Ten was around, there was some fantastic, mind-bending fanfic out there. I miss that.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on April 19th, 2012 06:10 am (UTC)
Perhaps I'm mistaken (since I'm viewing this from an outsider's perspective somewhat), but I feel like the Doctor Who fandom is also different now? They seem...lighter?

I went on about this when the new series with Matt Smith began to air, but for the first time in my life, I felt too old to be watching Doctor Who. At least, the current version of Doctor Who.

Moffat and his team actively set out to capture a younger audience (he's said this) and while younger doesn't automatically mean lighter, I think Moffat has largely written the show thinking teens = lighter.

Granted, there have been a few episodes good episodes in the new series. I really enjoyed the one penned by Neil Gaiman called "The Doctor's Wife." The ending of that one really evoked a lot of what the old series was like and I loved it.
Astoundingly fond of avocados and rainy weather.: YGO_WorthItguardian_chaos on April 19th, 2012 06:20 am (UTC)
What's really bad is that I feel too old when watching Doctor Who now. And this isn't at all a comment about age. This is a comment about me, a person in her 20s who still can sit down a couple times a year and watch Yu-gi-oh, for crying out loud. And I can't sit down and watch Doctor Who anymore. When YU-GI-OH is more mature than Doctor Who, there is a SERIOUS PROBLEM. Because that should be impossible. The entire universe should be reeling at this knowledge, because it is simply not right. *headdesks*

I, personally, disagree with making shows aimed at kids and teenagers "lighter." I mean, yes, omit some things, but I tend to find that kids and teens can often handle much bigger ideas than they're given credit for. A lot of what I watched as a kid was very dark. I don't think it's bad to expose kids to ideas, and I worry for anyone raised on the fluffy, cotton candy diet modern cartoons seem to offer.

Granted, there have been a few episodes good episodes in the new series. I really enjoyed the one penned by Neil Gaiman called "The Doctor's Wife."

Ah, yes, that episode! I did enjoy that episode. Bravo, Neil Gaiman, for providing a break in my Doctor Who-bitterness! *applauds* The TARDIS as a humanoid form was an interesting concept, to say the least.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on April 19th, 2012 06:25 am (UTC)
Hey, YuGiOh deals with some heavy stuff. The story of the Kaiba brothers is NOT light.

I feel like one of the problems is that Doctor Who still does throw in serious themes and conflicts but chooses to resolve them in ultimately light way. And by light I mean way too quickly and in a manner that gives the feeling that there's no real consequence to anything. Granted, this might have changed later on in the show when I stopped watching.

There's also my opinion that fundamentally, I feel like RTD is a better writer than Moffat. Yes, Moffat has written some winning material. But in terms of scope, I don't find him to be as interesting as what RTD ultimately tried to tackle. And yes, sometimes he completely failed (that last season of Torchwood for Starz was HORRIBLE) but sometimes he succeeded on levels that Moffat has yet to reach. RTD has weight. Moffat has sparkle. That's kind of how I tend to view them in my very reductive, fannish mind.
Astoundingly fond of avocados and rainy weather.: YGO_WorthItguardian_chaos on April 19th, 2012 06:34 am (UTC)
Well, yes, which is why I still enjoy watching it on occasion. But still, I mean, it would be difficult for me to ignore that it is a silly show. Wooooo!! Card games! Ultra-deep-voiced protagonist!! WHO WAS A PHARAOH IN ANCIENT EGYPT! And is now a NECKLACE! I'm not blind to it. I embrace it for how ridiculous it is, regardless of all its dark aspects. XD

How do you know about the Kaiba brothers, though? I wasn't aware you had exposure to Yu-Gi-Oh. Or Yugioh. Or Yu-Gi-Oh! Blast, I've known the show for years and yet I only ever call it YGO because everything else is too strange-looking.

Granted, this might have changed later on in the show when I stopped watching.

Yeah, I have a slightly unsettled, nervous feeling in my gut when I judge the newer episodes of Doctor Who, because yes, I could be wrong. *shrugs* It all kind of went downhill when Ten met River Song. I didn't like the idea of her then, and making her a main character was just further reason to withdraw.

RTD has weight. Moffat has sparkle. That's kind of how I tend to view them in my very reductive, fannish mind.

That seems like a delightfully apt description, I must say. *G*
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on April 19th, 2012 06:37 am (UTC)
I wasn't aware you had exposure to Yu-Gi-Oh.

I've actually seen several episodes of YuGiOh. It was one of the many animes that crossed my path when I was steeped in watching anime.

But still, I mean, it would be difficult for me to ignore that it is a silly show.

I feel like anime in general (a lot of them) do this best. They are so wonderfully bipolar in that we have utter silliness in one scene and then a sudden shift to something so dark and traumatic it tickles my evil heart.

It all kind of went downhill when Ten met River Song.

I felt like she was fine as a one off character. I really can't judge how she was as a full fledged one b/c I didn't see the bulk of her episodes with Eleven. I was somewhat not impressed with the reveal of her actual identity but probably has more to do with my opinions on who her parents are.
Astoundingly fond of avocados and rainy weather.: ST_Captain'sChairguardian_chaos on April 19th, 2012 06:52 am (UTC)
Oh, you know what, YuGiOh (*steals your letter organization*) is another reason I couldn't do the above meme. The last episode of YuGiOh has an ending that fills me with so much dread that it's still the first ending that popped up in my head when I saw this meme. And it is NOT a favorite ending. I HATE IT AND AM IN SO MUCH DENIAL THAT I EVEN WROTE FIC IN 2008 TO TRY TO GO AGAINST IT. But no one cared or commented, and in 2008, that was enough to keep me from continuing it. It was really well-written, though. *pouts* It remains one of my favorite works of mine, actually, even though it's just one chapter. I did research for Egyptian gods and their version of the afterlife/mortality/death/judgment for it, and I think it actually managed to show, because it was brilliant.

I'm sorry. I just fell into self-promotion there for a sec. *coughs* Maybe I should continue that one. I really did love it.

They are so wonderfully bipolar in that we have utter silliness in one scene and then a sudden shift to something so dark and traumatic it tickles my evil heart.

I think I could pinpoint this attribute in nearly anything I've ever obsessed over. I must like bipolar attributes in my fandoms. It delights me. XD