?

Log in

No account? Create an account
 
 
29 January 2012 @ 09:50 pm
Poirot: Death on the Nile  
For my last weekend before the spring semester begins, I frantically tried to rid myself of the last bits of my cold. And watched two very different movies. Last night I saw Man on a Ledge which I'll review later. And then I went home and watched this brilliant adaptation of one of Agatha Christie's most famous mysteries.

As is the case with most episodes of this ITV series starring David Suchet, it guest starred a bunch of well known actors. So hello, Zoe Telford, David Soul, Emily Blunt, JJ Feild, Judy Parfitt, James Fox, Frances de la Tour, and Steve Pemberton!


While on vacation in Egypt, Poirot ends up on a cruise down the Nile where a brutal murder takes place. The victim is Linnet Ridgeway, a wealthy heiress who'd recently gotten married to Simon Doyle. Turns out, Simon was actually the fiance of Linnet's best friend, Jacqueline de Bellefort, a penniless young woman who had originally introduced Simon to Linnet in hopes that her friend would give Simon a job. After Simon and Linnet had married instead, Jackie had begun to stalk them, following them all the way to Egypt a mission to make their lives miserable...and possibly murder her backstabbing friend. But obviously nothing is exactly as it seems as Christie gives us a boatload of other people who had their own various connections to Linnet and a set of what looks like unshakeable alibis for one and all...until more bodies start to turn up.

Death on the Nile is one of my favorite Christie mysteries. I think it's the solution which that I ultimately enjoy because it's such a neat example of a solution that makes sense but at the same time is a surprise. Christie wrote this story after her husband left her for another woman and her hatred for the Other Woman shows up nice and strong here. There's very little left undone to show Linnet to be a selfish, manipulative woman who very cheerfully stole from Jackie the only thing the latter had left. Like so many murder victims before her, Linnet isn't exactly mourned when she's killed, with the possible exception of Simon. Or not.

I really enjoyed the more or less straightforward adaptation ITV did of this story. The casting and the acting was brilliant all the around. I particularly enjoyed the casting of JJ Feild as Simon. I'm not really a fan of Feild with regard to his acting abilities but given what we learn about Simon, I have to say that Feild was a great choice. The same goes for Steve Pemberton as Dr. Bessner, even though it took me a bit to not keep thinking of Bessner as a less neurotic version of Herr Lipp.


ITV has announced that they are making the final series of Poirot. Apparently Hugh Fraser will return as Hastings. As much as I look forward to more Poirot, I'm already weeping that this set will be the last with the adaptation of Curtain. I'm going to need lots of tea and tissues for that viewing.
 
 
 
The Writer They Call Tay: BB: Oh No!awanderingbard on January 30th, 2012 03:50 am (UTC)
I was going to say I've seen this one, but then I realized I was thinking of " An Appointment With Death". Which, in my defense, is also one of those 'Poirot travels in a country which is far less safe today' stories. Hopefully I will see this if Zip ever decides to send me the Poirot DVD collection. I'm working my way through Lewis at the moment. I've read "Death on the Nile", though. And played the computer game!

So sad for Curtain! I can understand why they want to finish up the series, but the solution to that one is so sad on so many levels. :(

Someone on a Sherlock comm wanted a Sherlock/Poirot crossover and I'm contemplating giving it a go. At the very least, I think John and Hastings would get on very well. But I can't figure out how to make Poirot fit into modern times without taking away all his Poirotness.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on January 30th, 2012 03:53 am (UTC)
'Poirot travels in a country which is far less safe today' stories.

Yup, there's a barrel of those stories.

Someone on a Sherlock comm wanted a Sherlock/Poirot crossover and I'm contemplating giving it a go. At the very least, I think John and Hastings would get on very well. But I can't figure out how to make Poirot fit into modern times without taking away all his Poirotness.

OOOOOOO!!! It would indeed be a brilliant crossover. Their contrasting finicky-ness alone would be hilarious. Hastings and John would get on. Hastings actually reminds me a bit of Mike Stamford in that he's almost always sunny and just an average nice guy.
The Writer They Call Tay: SHERLOCK: Watson giggleawanderingbard on January 30th, 2012 12:43 pm (UTC)

OOOOOOO!!! It would indeed be a brilliant crossover. Their contrasting finicky-ness alone would be hilarious. Hastings and John would get on. Hastings actually reminds me a bit of Mike Stamford in that he's almost always sunny and just an average nice guy.


I thought John and Hastings could compare notes. "Does yours leave body parts in the fridge?" "No, mine gets stroppy when his shoes get dirty and keeps telling me my moustache is not a real moustache."

I'd also like to write the part of the story where Poirot goes 'let's gather all the suspect together and tell them how the crime was committed' and Sherlock goes 'let's call the police, find out if I was right, gloat a little and go home'.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on January 30th, 2012 01:42 pm (UTC)
"Mine never eats. It's worrying."
"Mine never stops eating. It's worrying."

I'd also like to write the part of the story where Poirot goes 'let's gather all the suspect together and tell them how the crime was committed' and Sherlock goes 'let's call the police, find out if I was right, gloat a little and go home'.

TEE HEE! I feel like they'd spent the denouement trying to shove each other out of the way to explain what happened.

On a slightly more serious note, I noticed while watching Poirot that one of the things I love the best about him is that he treats everyone the way they deserve based on their character, not class. He's always kind to those who need it and deserve it and dismissive to those for the same reason.

I guess you can say Sherlock is also class-blind in the sense that he treats everyone with the same rudeness.
The Writer They Call Tay: SHERLOCK: Watson giggleawanderingbard on January 30th, 2012 02:04 pm (UTC)
"Mine never eats. It's worrying."
"Mine never stops eating. It's worrying."


"Mine asks me questions and then makes fun of me when I answer."
"Mine does that too!"

TEE HEE! I feel like they'd spent the denouement trying to shove each other out of the way to explain what happened.

Hee! And Hastings, John, Japp and Lestrade would all be face-palming in the background.

I guess you can say Sherlock is also class-blind in the sense that he treats everyone with the same rudeness.

That's very true. I imagine Poirot wouldn't have been raised with such a class system in Belgium, and Sherlock just could not care less. You are either interesting or you're not. Unless you're Mrs. Hudson. And occasionally John.

Poirot is more of a manipulator, though. He'll play along to get information whereas Sherlock will assume a role until he gets what he wants and then drop the whole thing and move on. But Poirot is more interested in why and Sherlock is more interested in how.