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30 August 2014 @ 06:18 pm
Casting for Agent Carter  
So this journal is just turning into a MCU journal now it seems...

Anyway, some information about the casting of two characters and the inclusion of one canon character for the Agent Carter series.


I never really watched Dollhouse so I have no idea what sort of actor Enver Gjokaj is so I'll just have to wait and see. I'm going to try and ignore everything I've seen Chad Michael Murray when I sit down to watch Agent Carter. He doesn't look terribly 1940s to me but that's what the magic of hair, makeup, and wardrobe is for.

So MCU is going to go with there having once been a human Jarvis? Interesting. I'll be curious to see who they get for this role which I have a feeling will be small but still notable. It probably won't happen but a flashforward to seeing child!Tony would be nice.
 
 
 
The Writer They Call Tayawanderingbard on August 30th, 2014 11:29 pm (UTC)
I watched a bit of Dollhouse back in the day, and all I really remember is that he dd the childlike blankness of the dolls without their programming really well, which isn't saying much. I don't remember seeing much of him when he was programmed, though. He played a cop in the Avengeers movie. Maybe a descendent of ths character.:-)

I know they mentioned human!Jarvis in one of the tie-in comics. I am conflicted, because on the one hand I think it's sweet that Tony cared enough about him to have an Ai to continue to look after him, but on the other, I love AI Jarvis so much, I want to believe he was original to himself.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 12:06 am (UTC)
Is Victor the one who once got the personality of a party girl? I feel like I saw clips of that somewhere on the Internet.

but on the other, I love AI Jarvis so much, I want to believe he was original to himself.

Tony probably sees AI Jarvis as the child he and Human!Jarvis had. Not sure how AI Jarvis would feel about that.
The Writer They Call Tayawanderingbard on August 31st, 2014 12:50 am (UTC)
I only watched part of the first season, so I can't accurately say. It was one of those shows I wanted to like more than I did. I don't think Eliza Dushku was the right person to handle that part. They would have been better to have Dichen Lachman as Echo, I think.


Tony probably sees AI Jarvis as the child he and Human!Jarvis had. Not sure how AI Jarvis would feel about that.


JARVIS: This feels very Freudian, sir.
Tony: What did I say about looking though the psych section on Wikipedia?
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 01:03 am (UTC)
Joss Whedon shows and I have a complicated relationship and "Dollhouse" was one of those that I felt 'meh' about from the start so I peaced out.

JARVIS: This feels very Freudian, sir.
Tony: What did I say about looking though the psych section on Wikipedia?


*two minutes later*

JARVIS: Sir, I've finished perusing the original works of Sigmund Freud and my earlier assessment still seems accurate. I've also taken the liberty of browsing other theorists. Many of sir's eccentricities now make greater sense.

Tony: Seriously, I'm putting a child lock on you.
The Writer They Call Tayawanderingbard on August 31st, 2014 01:47 am (UTC)
I enjoyed Firefly a lot, though I now recognize the cultural appropriation in it that I didn't know about at the time (I wasn't familiar with the concept), the rest is sort of take it or leave it for me. Dollhouse wasn't my thing, but Ama really wanted to watch it, so I put up with it for a while.

Tony: Seriously, I'm putting a child lock on you.

JARVIS: I think that would be counterproductive, sir. You would have to get a grown-up in each time you wanted me to do something for you.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 01:51 am (UTC)
Weirdly, I kind of let the cultural appropriation go at the time I watched Firefly (I also really liked the actual stories a lot) but the whole thing was sort of ruined for me post-watching an interview with Whedon about his use of Chinese culture. His response was offensive and it forever tainted my viewing of that particular show.
The Writer They Call Tayawanderingbard on August 31st, 2014 02:32 am (UTC)
I really loved almost all the characters on Firefly. I thought they were very complex and interesting.

But I always thought it was odd that, in a world where everyone has been assimilated into Chinese culture, there were no Asian or Asian descended characters. I don't even remember any guest stars being Asian.

I feel like Asia is still treated as the Exotic East, and I'm not sure why. I don't know if there just aren't enough Asian writers being hired to counterbalance things and other writers aren't bothering to try, or they're still a comparatively new culture to arrive in the US, or what.

One thing I've noticed about the Glow magazine we get through being members at Shopper's Drug Mart is how many Asian models they use, and that was when I realized how few Asian models I see elsewhere.

Edited at 2014-08-31 02:32 am (UTC)
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 02:41 am (UTC)
But I always thought it was odd that, in a world where everyone has been assimilated into Chinese culture, there were no Asian or Asian descended characters. I don't even remember any guest stars being Asian.

There was one Asian character I could remember. He was an old man dressed in your typical old Chinese man garb who owned a shop, I think? Yeah, that was about it.

I feel like Asia is still treated as the Exotic East, and I'm not sure why. I don't know if there just aren't enough Asian writers being hired to counterbalance things, or they're still a comparatively new culture to arrive in the US, or what.

Man, I feel like I can go into a long history of Asians in America and how it's leaked over into the way the entertainment world has used us. I mainly say that because I ended up doing a lot of research about Asian immigration for my dissertation.

I'm not sure if there's any overlap between how Asians assimilated in the US and how we assimilated in Canada. But in the US, I think there has been a history of how Asians were deemed "acceptable" in this country when the Chinese first came over. And partly due to those stereotypes and Asians in the US adhering to them to a certain extent in order to be accepted, it's set up a system where we're often ignored or appropriated with little thought or deemed 'a threat' to the education system which hasn't lost its foothold. May we be model minorities or 'yellow peril', we're always different and 'other' and therefore exotic.

Things have definitely improved a little in the last few years or so in the entertainment world. But what I've often found in regards to race in the US is that it's a pendulum. We get a wave of everyone being very accepting for a bit before going back the other way.
The Writer They Call Tayawanderingbard on August 31st, 2014 03:02 am (UTC)
I'm not sure if there's any overlap between how Asians assimilated in the US and how we assimilated in Canada.

I have to admit that my knowledge of Asians in Canada is limited in regards to history. Most of my knowledge comes from the My Heritage minutes and a Dear Canada book I read when I was younger. I know the Chinese immigrants were very involved in the building of the railroad and were treated horrifically, and we did this, so you know, we haven't got much of a high hill to look down on the States from.

I think, in general, Canada has less of an emphasis on assimilation, but I don't have the experience of being an immigrant or minority to know if that's true. I'm trying to think if there's any more diversity on Canadian made programmes, but I can't really think of anything off-hand. We've had Little Mosque on the Prairie, How to be Indie, 'da Kink in My Hair, North of 60, and Arctic Air, which all have a mainly POC cast or focus, but I don't think Asians get any more representation here.

formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 03:11 am (UTC)
The US did something similar in terms of a Chinese Exclusion Act and there was also Japanese concentration camps.

I think, in general, Canada has less of an emphasis on assimilation, but I don't have the experience of being an immigrant or minority to know if that's true.

Well, in my somewhat limited exposure to Canada, it felt like when Canadians saw me it was more with either a look of "Are you from the US? You walk awfully fast" or when I was seated I got "Hello, fellow Canadian?" It felt like Canadians were aware that Asians live in Canada and odds were either was either one of them or a visiting American.

In America, I still sometimes get the odd, "Where are you from?" "Massachusetts." "No, REALLY from? Like your parents?" exchange which implies I'm not from America or an English speaking country at the very least.

but I don't think Asians get any more representation here.

I'd be curious what the reasons are. I'm sure they're not quite so simple but in the US it's that ye olde reason of non-White faces not being relatable to the majority (white people) to make the show/movie sell.
The Writer They Call Tayawanderingbard on August 31st, 2014 03:32 am (UTC)
The US did something similar in terms of a Chinese Exclusion Act and there was also Japanese concentration camps.

We had internment camps here as well after Pearl Harbour. Mostly in BC, I think, which had and still has a large Asian population.

It felt like Canadians were aware that Asians live in Canada and odds were either was either one of them or a visiting American.

Yeah, in that regard I would say we're generally aware that not every Canadian is going to be white. Although I did get in trouble at school for asking an student teacher who was of Indian descent where she was from, once. I meant, 'are you from *town where I live* or are you did you come here to go to teacher school?', but obviously she had been asked the question with the former meaning enough to assume that's what I was asking.

I'm sure they're not quite so simple but in the US it's that ye olde reason of non-White faces not being relatable to the majority (white people) to make the show/movie sell.

I'd like to know if there are any statistics to back that up? Do Will Smith's movies make any less money for having an African-American as the hero?

I remember there was a TV movie here in Canada with a detective who was gay as main character and thinking 'wow, that's awesome'. I remember when his boyfriend walked in that it took me a moment to realize it was his boyfriend and not the straight-but-totally-close friend I was expecting.

There are also quite a few shows on the Aboriginal Peoples Network which feature, unsurprisingly, Aboriginal people.


Edited at 2014-08-31 03:32 am (UTC)
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 03:47 am (UTC)
I hope your teacher got the real story though and saw it was a misunderstanding!

Yeah, compared to the US, I think Canada is ahead in the race game just a bit. But to quote John Oliver about there never being racial tension, "That's never been true about any place on earth."

Do Will Smith's movies make any less money for having an African-American as the hero?

My friend's boyfriend who is an African American man who loves films once gave me a really good breakdown of why only certain Will Smith movies succeed in the US and that it has nothing to do with acceptance of black people in general as leads. I'm not about to do it any justice but his overall point was that Will Smith has created a niche for himself in Hollywood films as either the "Smooth Operator Who Only Gets the Non-White Woman" or the "Non-Threatening and/or Helpful Black Man" roles. According to him, whenever Smith deviated from those roles in movies, the movies did not do as well box office-wise.

Again, my general feeling is that the lack of minority representation in media is starting to shift a little toward the better with less excuses being made why only white people get leads. I say less, even after hearing about things like "Noah" and the still in production live-action version of "Akira" which so far has tried to cast almost all white actors despite it being a Japanese manga/anime with Japanese characters.
The Writer They Call Tayawanderingbard on August 31st, 2014 03:59 am (UTC)
I hope your teacher got the real story though and saw it was a misunderstanding!

She didn't say anything until the whole class got a lecture about racism and brought it up. Which isn't to say she was specifically directing it at me, other people might have asked her the same question. It was part of a lecture after a woman was brought in to tell us about the Little Red Dot Club, and handed out little red dot stickers to a student, asking her to distribute them at recess. When we came back in from recess, we were all sat down and lectured about how racist it was to wear the stickers, which was quite confusing considering we had only just been told how the stickers were to combat racism. I'm not saying they weren't right about it being racist. I'm just saying, it was an odd day.

According to him, whenever Smith deviated from those roles in movies, the movies did not do as well box office-wise.

So, as long as he is filling the prescribed idea of what it is acceptable for a Black man to be, he's fine. That's sad.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 04:01 am (UTC)
It was part of a lecture after a woman was brought in to tell us about the Little Red Dot Club, and handed out little red dot stickers to a student, asking her to distribute them at recess. When we came back in from recess, we were all sat down and lectured about how racist it was to wear the stickers, which was quite confusing considering we had only just been told how the stickers were to combat racism. I'm not saying they weren't right about it being racist. I'm just saying, it was an odd day.

Sounds like the people in charge didn't all go to the same meeting or something. That's weird and confusing. The day, I mean. Not the higher ups not communicating. That's normal.
The Writer They Call Tayawanderingbard on August 31st, 2014 04:16 am (UTC)
Not the higher ups not communicating. That's normal.

The Vice-Principal of my elementary school had a pet project that was designed to stamp out prejudice, and though it was very well-intentioned, it suffered a lot from this problem.

In any case, our wandering conversation has been very interesting and informative this evening. Kudos to us for tackling racism and talking quokkas in one evening.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 04:22 am (UTC)
Kudos to us for tackling racism and talking quokkas in one evening.

Yes, I realize we went from talking about really super cute animals and how we could sort of be them to racism. No one can accuse us of having run of the mill conversation tracks.
The Writer They Call Tayawanderingbard on August 31st, 2014 04:24 am (UTC)
My brother and I usually end up debating philosophy while waiting for movies to start, so you'd fit in well in my family.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 04:29 am (UTC)
My mom and I are a bit like that. We talk about serious things while watching media before one of us will randomly throw in a non sequitur.

Mom: Speaking of gender roles, did you know that before she died Elizabeth Taylor she had a male companion more than half her age? Does that make her the first cougar?

Me: Speaking of the public's unhealthy interest in other people's humiliation and misery, did you know Chris Evans grew up two towns over from here?
The Writer They Call Tayawanderingbard on August 31st, 2014 04:33 am (UTC)
Yep, sounds like a typical conversation between my mother and I. I never know if it's a sign of a healthy brain or a broken one.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 04:34 am (UTC)
I tell myself it's the sign of a healthy, creative brain. I try to ignore the part of me that just shakes her head slowly at that.
The Writer They Call Tayawanderingbard on August 31st, 2014 04:43 am (UTC)
At least we're well-informed. Sort of.
aelfgyfu_meadaelfgyfu_mead on August 31st, 2014 01:07 am (UTC)
I had serious problems with Dollhouse; I watched a couple of early episodes and found it deeply disturbing and upsetting. I have problems when people start talking about how much of a feminist Joss Whedon is when I couldn't stomach what the characters, and particularly the female characters, went through in that show. (No, putting some men through much of it too doesn't make it ok.)

But Enver Gjokaj was brilliant. He was so good that BH called me in to watch him in a scene when he accidentally got Kiki the Party Girl downloaded into him.

I watched the end of the series, the last several episodes, because the beginning had been deeply upsetting, and I wanted to see the characters triumph over it all (which isn't exactly what I got, because it's Joss). Gjokaj was just amazing. I hope he gets chances to do really good stuff with Agent Carter!
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 01:18 am (UTC)
I have problems when people start talking about how much of a feminist Joss Whedon is

I watched the entirety of "Buffy", "Angel", "Firefly" and two of his films (Avengers & Cabin in the Woods). Based on that, I think calling him a feminist really speaks to how lazy the rest of the entertainment world must be when it comes to writing female characters. Oh, you have a female character who thinks and has feelings that aren't all about loving a man? You're a feminist! The bar is really set low. Like any creative writer with some talent, Whedon had hits and misses in the gender department. He gets an absolute zero though from me for race relations in his work. Although I haven't yet started "Agents of SHIELD" so I might revise after that. He may get at least a point.

But Enver Gjokaj was brilliant. He was so good that BH called me in to watch him in a scene when he accidentally got Kiki the Party Girl downloaded into him.

Ah, that was him! Okay, I saw clips of his scenes as Kiki and thought it was pretty funny.

Gjokaj was just amazing. I hope he gets chances to do really good stuff with Agent Carter!

According to Wikipedia, he's playing Daniel Sousa, a war vet who joins SSR. A part of me wonders if he's the future Mr. Carter whom Peggy referenced in Cap 2 as having married someone whom Steve saved during the war.
aelfgyfu_mead: Melinda Mayaelfgyfu_mead on August 31st, 2014 02:38 am (UTC)
I saw Firefly but never got into Buffy and Angel. And maybe I'm being too hard on Whedon, but at least it's not that he's telling people what a great feminist he is. Rather, I've seen a couple of clips where he seems embarrassed when someone tells him that, and he says that he's not doing all that much.

Agents of SHIELD passes the Bechdel Test every episode. I think they're doing really well with gender, actually. Race? I keep meaning to write about that. I think they messed it up big time early in the series, and it really bothered me, but I stuck with it largely because I became attached to a couple of the characters quickly—I went in liking Coulson, and May won me over fairly early, and the Science Twins are almost too much but not quite too much. I think they're doing better by the end of the first season, but I'm waiting to see what the second season will bring.

Then again, Joss was one of the creators, but I've heard he isn't involved much in the day-to-day business of the show; he has writing credit for one episode, but Jed Whedon for seven.

Yes, he was funny as Kiki—but he can also do scary—terrifying, in fact—and committed, and desperate, and he just has fantastic range and great charisma and I'm even more excited about Agent Carter than I was before.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on August 31st, 2014 02:45 am (UTC)
Agents of SHIELD passes the Bechdel Test every episode. I think they're doing really well with gender, actually. Race? I keep meaning to write about that. I think they messed it up big time early in the series, and it really bothered me,...I think they're doing better by the end of the first season, but I'm waiting to see what the second season will bring.

I'll definitely be giving this show a look but it's good to know I'll have to stick through some poor stuff before it gets better. I've done it with countless other shows (Torchwood, Merlin, Sherlock) so AoS is in good company.

I'm even more excited about Agent Carter than I was before.

I found more information about the supporting characters HERE.

So yup, this is only fueling my thoughts that Sousa may be the future Mr. Carter. He might have been a member of the 107th who got invalided out after Steve rescued them all so he didn't get a chance to join the Howling Commandos and has joined SSR now to help.

Also, Thompson sounds like a jerk but one who may grow. Which kind of explains the CMM casting.

Edited at 2014-08-31 02:46 am (UTC)