?

Log in

No account? Create an account
 
 
06 December 2013 @ 12:10 pm
Elementary: Tremors  
Despite the odd mashup of flashbacks and time jumps, the characterizations AND the plot of this one managed to draw me in.


As always this show's use of its characters stands way above their actual mystery. But I was particularly interested in this one because it featured the exoneration of someone who suffers from schizophrenia. Of all the mental disorders out there, schizophrenia seems to get the most mythology padded around it. To a large extent it makes sense because if a show very accurately showed what a schizophrenic episode looked like (any schizophrenic subtypes), it would make for some boring TV. So I largely accept that if someone gets the label of schizophrenic on a show, they'll most likely be violent, delusional, and/or hallucinating in the most obvious way. Elementary didn't really stray too far from these elements and since Silas wasn't the main character focus, they didn't do much to flush out his character. However, I really, REALLY appreciated Joan's one comment when they were at Silas' apartment and Bell noted that he was in no shape to be dating: "We don't know what he was like on his meds."

It was a small point and could easily be cast aside, but I appreciated that Joan at least offered the potential for schizophrenics living a fuller life with the help of meds and hopefully therapy. We rarely get any of this because shows tend to focus in more on the "crazy" aspects of this disorder so it was nice to see at least a sliver of how Silas life was and maybe still could be with a certain level of care and treatment.

Anyway, onto the character stuff. Everyone was pretty much on target from Sherlock's reaction of not visiting Bell at the hospital to Joan remaining firm and encouraging about why he SHOULD to Gregson very logically showing Sherlock how acting like he's above the trial would only hurt himself. As obnoxious as it was, I liked Sherlock's cross examining of Joan because his admiration for her abilities was so clear on his face. I liked that the prosecutor is very much able to compartmentalize her role as a prosecutor against Sherlock but when the trial was over she is another former addict speaking to another former addict. Prosecutors on shows like this always get thrown under the bus of being jerks so I liked that as hard assed as she was when pursuing the trial, when it was over it was clear there was nothing personal at stake for her about this. She's doing her job and now that the job is over, she can be human. This was, I felt like, a good contrast to Sherlock who lives, eats, and breathes his work and there is no dividing line between his job and who he is as a person.

We've had one episode that was Bell-centric in the past, but with that I really wasn't able to predict ahead of time how he'd react to Sherlock finally coming to see him. To me, either a rejecting or accepting reaction would have both made equal sense given what little we know personality-wise about him. I'm guessing Bell encouraged the commissioner to keep Holmes and Watson as consultants because getting rid of them would mean a drop in arrest rates as well as having to re-open up a ton of old cases. But he's still super bitter about the possibility of his career ending because Sherlock couldn't be less of a dick. I guess we'll see how long this plot line goes. I feel like the show is setting up some interesting points of characters starting to move away from Sherlock. Bell this week and somewhat Joan last week when she criticized Sherlock's inability to use tact with anyone other than her and it not being acceptable in the long run. I do wonder if anything major will come of it.
 
 
 
aelfgyfu_mead: Joan Watsonaelfgyfu_mead on December 7th, 2013 03:26 am (UTC)
As always this show's use of its characters stands way above their actual mystery.
Yes! At least this time they didn't even pretend it was really about the mystery. I called the killer early but got his motive wrong.

But I was particularly interested in this one because it featured the exoneration of someone who suffers from schizophrenia.
YES. I appreciated Joan's comment, and also Sherlock's insistence that not only was his exoneration a Good Thing, but that the judge and the prosecutor had better recognize it for a Good Thing or not even pretend they care about a system that works the way it should.

I would have been disappointed if Bell weren't bitter. I wouldn't have wanted to see Holmes either, and Holmes trying to appease his own guilt by finding (and funding) the best physiotherapy would probably have infuriated me. Marcus generally plays his cards close to his chest, and I like how the actor conveyed a lot while saying little. I hope they let this relationship continue to develop slowly and not try to rush it, or his physical recovery. I want Marcus to be okay in the long run, but I don't want us to act next week as if it never happened. I do have some hope that the show won't do that.

I also hope that this episode coming so soon after Joan's insistence that Sherlock needs to treat people better mean that this will continue to be a theme. Brilliant Husband argues that Sherlock is in the habit of being blunt and even mean to people because it keeps them off balance and leads them to spill information, but he must see now that there are real costs to his behavior—and he isn't always the one to pay those costs.

I still don't think Sherlock quite gets it. I don't think being nicer outside the police station would have helped; that man went to a police station with a gun. He was planning to use it, and he knew he wouldn't walk away. Sherlock needed to have been better behaved at the office, from the get-go. He knew the man had a history of violence, but he didn't care, because he didn't think anyone else could get hurt (and he's absurdly reckless himself). I hope he's starting to get it, though.
formerly lifeinsomniacjoonscribble on December 7th, 2013 03:49 am (UTC)
also Sherlock's insistence that not only was his exoneration a Good Thing, but that the judge and the prosecutor had better recognize it for a Good Thing or not even pretend they care about a system that works the way it should.

YES. I very much appreciated this and was all aboard Sherlock rubbing people the wrong way if it meant this point got across. It needed to be stressed.

I want Marcus to be okay in the long run, but I don't want us to act next week as if it never happened. I do have some hope that the show won't do that.

I also hold rather high hopes that the show won't drop this after one episode. They've done pretty well with building on the character pieces so I'm hoping this will be a springboard to showing us a little more of Bell but also Sherlock reacting to what happened beyond just the one episode.

I also hope that this episode coming so soon after Joan's insistence that Sherlock needs to treat people better mean that this will continue to be a theme.

I'm guessing this will be a theme. Even Mycroft cautioned Sherlock to think about Joan when he was trying to get Sherlock to listen to their father. Yes, it was all lies but Mycroft's point about Sherlock needing to consider how his actions would affect other people around him was valid.

While I hope this theme isn't being built up so that the season will end on some sort of cliffhanger catastrophe, I do wonder if they are moving toward a point where Joan and Sherlock simply won't see eye to eye any longer on Sherlock's methods with people as being acceptable, even if it solves a case. I'm speculating once they get there then Joan might make a decision or some sort of choice that's in direct opposition to Sherlock.

As quick addition, I loved Gregson in this one for some reason. From his concerns about Bell to his parenting of Sherlock, it all made me smile. He and Joan seemed to have more exaggerated parental roles in this one which was interesting.